Weight Loss Surgery

If you are thinking about bariatric surgery and are having doubts about whether it is right for you, you’re not alone. Wondering if bariatric surgery is right for you is a very common concern. Bariatric surgery is a life-changing procedure, and making that decision requires research and a good amount of reflection.

The surgeons at Surgical Association of Mobile have performed over 8,000 weight loss surgeries since 1977.  They have stayed on the forefront of new technology and procedures helping to perfect the best operation for our patients. At Surgical Association of Mobile P.A. we focus on the science of weight loss and we will consider the appropriate surgery for you. Currently we offer four weight loss procedures for those patients who qualify.

gastric-sleeve

Sleeve Gastrectomy / Gastric Sleeve

gastric-bypass

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

lap-band

Gastric Band / Lap-Band

orbera-balloon

Intra-gastric balloon

You can also learn more about our robotic bariatric surgery program.

Surgical Association of Mobile was named a Bariatric Center of Excellence in 2006 and recertified in 2010 and 2015 by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and the Surgical Review Corporation.   This designation is awarded to programs with a proven record of favorable outcomes for weight loss surgery.

The scope of bariatric surgery is evolving and expanding constantly, which makes the choice of the “right” procedure a more complex one for the potential bariatric patient. This choice however can be narrowed significantly by understanding the ways in which bariatric surgery works. Weight loss surgery works in one or both of two ways, restriction and malabsorption, depending on which procedure you undergo.

Restrictive procedures, such as the sleeve gastrectomy / gastric sleeve and gastric band limit the amount of food the patient can consume in any given sitting. The gastric sleeve does so by removing about 80% of the existing stomach from the abdomen. The gastric band, on the other hand, uses an implanted device to form a small upper stomach, but never actually cuts any portion of the gastric pouch. The first part of the gastric bypass procedure also restricts the size of the stomach pouch and therefore the amount of food that can be consumed.

Malabsorptive procedures alter the small intestine and therefore the digestive process by reducing the amount of usable intestine. This reduces the number of calories that are absorbed through the sensitive intestinal walls. The second part of the gastric bypass is a malabsorptive process. Generally speaking, a combination of restricting and malabsorption will offer greater weight loss and disease resolution benefit than restriction alone, though this will largely rest on the individual patient’s circumstance.

Please bear in mind that the ultimate decision of which procedure is best for your particular circumstance will depend on the results of a series of preliminary medical tests and a consultation with one of our surgeons. You are not alone in this decision and we encourage you to contact us to learn more.

Bariatric Surgery Links & Resources

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